Another Kind of Distance: A Time Travel, Twin Peaks, Film, Comics, Nostalgia & History Podcast

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Scrooged (1988) and The Family Man (2000)

 

In our second holiday 'cast, we look at a couple of movies influenced by the classic tales/tellings of last year's episode. First, SCROOGED (1988) gives a Reagan-era spin to the Dickens standard, and also prepares Bill Murray for GROUNDHOG DAY (a great time-travel comedy that we've already 'casted about). Then, THE FAMILY MAN (2000) stars a shockingly subdued Nicholas Cage in a movie that nods to Dickens, IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE, and even GROUNDHOG DAY, but still – so Elise thinks – can't make its billionaire bachelor protagonist's dilemma wholly sympathetic. And what happened to those kids? We wish you happy holidays with your loved ones, whether “real” or part of your own private bubble universe, and will return in the new year!

 

Time (Travel) Table

0:00:00 Scrooged (1988)

1:39:00 The Family Man (2000)

 

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Intro Credits:

The Dream Syndicate "That's What You Always Say"

Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten (along with Debussy's music) in William Dieterle's Portrait of Jennie (1948)

  

Outro Credits:

Bette Davis + lounge singer in Edmund Goulding's Dark Victory (1939)

 

Original Another Kind of Distance artwork by Lee McClure

Direct download: Holiday2015.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:57pm EDT

Mr. Nobody (2009) & A Thousand Kisses Deep (2011)

Elise and Dave consider a narratively complex alternate reality extravaganza, MR. NOBODY (2009), and a time travel movie with a complex, A THOUSAND KISSES DEEP (2011). Each film offers a different answer to the question: are we doomed by our radical freedom of choice or our radical lack of it? Elise gets out the knives. Dave soft-pedals frantically. In the feedback section, we take David O. Selznick and Jennifer Jones seriously.

 

Time (Travel) Table

0:00:00 Mr. Nobody (2009)

1:35:00 A Thousand Kisses Deep (2011)

2:37:00 Mailbag

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Intro Credits:

The Dream Syndicate "That's What You Always Say"

Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten (along with Debussy's music) in William Dieterle's Portrait of Jennie (1948)

  

Outro Credits:

Bette Davis + lounge singer in Edmund Goulding's Dark Victory (1939)

 

Original Another Kind of Distance artwork by Lee McClure

Direct download: NobodyKissesDeep.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:18pm EDT

Man of the Century (1999) and The Sticky Fingers of Time (1997)

Elise and Dave look at two late-90s, low-budget, little-known indies, the high- concept/single-gag (depending on your point of view) MAN OF THE CENTURY (1999) and the ahead-of-its time (linearly speaking) THE STICKY FINGERS OF TIME (1997). Frank Gorshin's presence in the former film occasions autobiographical digressions about your hosts' abortive adventures in screenwriting. Dave inexplicably neglects to mention that the protagonist of his screenplay was a nicotine-addicted rabbit who substitutes carrots for cigarettes. Elise, prompted by the title and imagery of STICKY FINGERS, gets off-the-chain explicit. And in the feedback section: some breakthroughs.

 

Time (Travel) Table

0:00:00 Man of The Century (1999)

1:13:00 The Sticky Fingers of Time (1997)

2:28:00 Mailbag

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Intro Credits:

The Dream Syndicate "That's What You Always Say"

Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten (along with Debussy's music) in William Dieterle's Portrait of Jennie (1948)

  

Outro Credits:

Bette Davis + lounge singer in Edmund Goulding's Dark Victory (1939)

 

Original Another Kind of Distance artwork by Lee McClure

Direct download: stickyfingersofthecentury.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:29pm EDT

Sapphire & Steel: Assignment #1 - Escape Through a Crack in Time (1979)

Dave and Elise are assigned to guide you through the "bloody-minded impenetrability" (in the words of THE SCI-FI FREAK SITE) of obscure, no-budget British TV cult show SAPPHIRE AND STEEL (1979-82), about the strangest time police possibly in the history of the concept. In "Assignment 1," sometimes known as "Escape Through a Crack in Time," a cozy, isolated bourgeois household is invaded by the horrors of history when a nursery rhyme opens a time corridor that snatches away the parents, and only interdimensional beings with a Mulder-and-Scully-like thing going on, sent by a semi-transparent helmet floating through space, can save the day. But then a time monster's flashlight babies start making some really weird things happen, and, well... we try to explain.

 

Time (Travel) Table

0:00 Introductory ramblings and Sapphire and Steel

1:36:00 Mailbag

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Intro Credits:

The Dream Syndicate "That's What You Always Say"

Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten (along with Debussy's music) in William Dieterle's Portrait of Jennie (1948)

 

Interlude Music:

"Magnet and Steel" Walter Egan

 

Outro Credits:

Bette Davis + lounge singer in Edmund Goulding's Dark Victory (1939)

 

Original Another Kind of Distance artwork by Lee McClure

Direct download: SapphSteel.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:06am EDT

X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014) and Uncanny X-Men #141-142 (1981)

Dave and Elise concentrate on one movie, X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (2014), in this episode, in order to leave time for grappling with mixed feelings about the cinematic legacy of superhero comics. We even went back to the original texts (Uncanny X-Men #141 and #142), just to get into the proper spirit of this thing. Then it's on to Bryan Singer's opus. Is Peter Dinklage's performance as Bolivar Trask a “big turd that just lies there”? Can anyone defend Magneto's trajectory in this film as psychologically consistent? Is mild sexism a sufficient motivator for Mystique's illogical course of action? And where was Wolverine's 2023 consciousness hanging out all those years, waiting for his body to show up? We ask the hard questions here at AKoD.

And remember: this episode.... everybody dies!!!!

Time (Travel) Table

0:00 Comic Book Talk and previous X-Men film talk

24:00 X-Men: Days of Future Past

2:22:00 More comic book talk and Mailbag!

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Intro Credits:

The Dream Syndicate "That's What You Always Say"

Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten (along with Debussy's music) in William Dieterle's Portrait of Jennie (1948)

 

Outro Credits:

Bette Davis + lounge singer in Edmund Goulding's Dark Victory (1939)

 

Original Another Kind of Distance artwork by Lee McClure

Direct download: X-Men.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:49pm EDT

Twilight Zone Time Travel Sampler - Walking Distance; A Stop at Willoughby; The Trouble With Templeton

In this “sampler” 'cast we consider three classic-series TWILIGHT ZONE episodes, “Walking Distance,” “A Stop at Willoughby,” and “The Trouble with Templeton,” which cover a range of narrative possibilities for time-travel scenarios of longing for the personal or cultural past. But what does it have to do with Freud's death drive? Or Leslie Fiedler's interpretation of American masculinity in LOVE AND DEATH IN THE AMERICAN NOVEL? Does Rod Serling's critique of the mid-century, middle-class American male gender role the key to the sub-genre Elise wants to call “morbid time travel”?

 

Special addendum: a rewatch of "Trouble With Templeton" reveals that the much-discussed script pages wind up in Templeton's pocket by accident - he grabs the script away from Laura at the table in order to stop her from using it as a prop in her flibbertigibbit act. So, in fact, she does not seem to have intended for him to have it. (Or did she wave it around in order to make him want to take it?) Please discuss!

 

Time (Travel) Table

0:00 Walking Distance

48:00 A Stop at Willoughby

1:21:00 The Trouble With Templeton

2:06:00 Mailbag!

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Intro Credits:

The Dream Syndicate "That's What You Always Say"

Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten (along with Debussy's music) in William Dieterle's Portrait of Jennie (1948)

 

Outro Credits:

Bette Davis + lounge singer in Edmund Goulding's Dark Victory (1939)

Direct download: Twilight_Sampler2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:51am EDT

Dangerous Corner (1934) and Repeat Performance (1947)

David and Elise nearly expire on a ludicrously hot Labour Day in order to record our labour of love and bring you our discussion of two spec-fic curiosities from Hollywood's classical era that confirm last episode's Lynchapalooza as central to our topic. We propose DANGEROUS CORNER (1934), based on a play by “time-slip” dramatist and theorist J. B. Priestly, as the missing link between Henry James's weirdo novella The SACRED FOUNT and MULHOLLAND DR; while REPEAT PERFORMANCE (1947), a STAR IS BORN-meets-TWILIGHT ZONE melodrama, keeps us riveted with a central couple that makes Diane and Camilla look like... well, Betty and Rita.

 

Time Table

0:00 Dangerous Corner

1:01:30 Repeat Performance

2:11 Mailbag!

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Direct download: dangerous_repeat.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:40am EDT

Mulholland Dr. (2001) and Inland Empire (2006)

A very special extravaganza in which Dave and Elise return to themes of temporal strangeness, alternate universes, transdimensional beings, and doubling in David Lynch. We contemplate how Laura Dern in INLAND EMPIRE (2006) is like Scott Bakula in QUANTUM LEAP, and how the final section of MULHOLLAND DR (2001) might be like the alternate universe in IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE. If you are a person who cares about the good life, you will enjoy this podcast episode.

 

Time Table

0:00 Mulholland Dr.

2:34 Inland Empire

4:24:30 Mailbag!

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out

 

 

Direct download: mulholland_empire.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:12pm EDT

The Philadelphia Experiment (1984) and The Final Countdown (1980)

In this episode of the podcast, Dave and Elise contemplate two movies about time travel and the military, one of which takes us from WWII to the 80s (THE PHILADELPHIA EXPERIMENT, 1984) and the other in the opposite direction (THE FINAL COUNTDOWN, 1980). We contemplate Nancy Allen's power to soothe Dave and Martin Sheen's weird second-hand Stockholm effect on Elise, and prove not to know such basic facts as whether deserts are subject to seasonal temperature changes and whether there were helicopters in the 1940s (at least without referring to ANNIE, 1982, for the answer)*. To quote listener Jay, who appears again in our Mail Bag section, “Pseudo-intellectuals indeed.”

*According to historynet.com: “The Army bought its first helicopter, a Vought-Sikorsky XR-4, on January 10, 1941, and operated a few improved models of that aircraft in Europe and Asia during the later stages of World War II. The first recorded use of a U.S. helicopter in combat came in May 1944, when an Army chopper rescued four drowned airmen behind enemy lines in Burma.” According to the TV Tropes page for ANNIE, “That helicopter is quite advanced for 1933. Considering Warbucks calls it an 'auto-copter' and describes it as a new invention, it's possibly meant to be some kind of Diesel Punk device.” That shows us not to rely on early 80s musicals about the Depression for our historical knowledge. Pseudo-intellectuals INDEED. I think Dave's new novel might be in the Diesel Punk genre, though.

 

(New!) Index

0:00 Greetings and The Philadelphia Experiment

1:46 The Final Countdown

2:29 Feedback

 

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out

Direct download: philadelphia_experiment_and_final_countdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:44pm EDT

Lost in Austen (2008)

What happens when Jane Austen meets Back to the Future? In LOST IN AUSTEN (2008), a modern-day Pride and Prejudice fan travels to the fictional past and tries not to screw up the canon pairings, but it's hard when you're irresistible to every man in the story, and some of the women. Dave and Elise try to figure out if Mary Sue can ever be an adequate substitute for Elizabeth Bennet, and whether the latter would really choose the internet over Mr. Darcy. Elise struggles to remember what she actually discovered as a research assistant on the Cambridge Edition of Jane Austen's Juvenilia (2006) except that Austen hated babies, and Dave laments his Stereo Mouth.

The discussion leads inexorably to the interesting quetion: Are ALL time travel tales "Mary Sue" narratives?

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out!

 

Direct download: AKOD_-_Lost_in_Austen.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:43pm EDT