Another Kind of Distance: A Time Travel, Twin Peaks, Film, Comics, Nostalgia & History Podcast

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Dangerous Corner (1934) and Repeat Performance (1947)

David and Elise nearly expire on a ludicrously hot Labour Day in order to record our labour of love and bring you our discussion of two spec-fic curiosities from Hollywood's classical era that confirm last episode's Lynchapalooza as central to our topic. We propose DANGEROUS CORNER (1934), based on a play by “time-slip” dramatist and theorist J. B. Priestly, as the missing link between Henry James's weirdo novella The SACRED FOUNT and MULHOLLAND DR; while REPEAT PERFORMANCE (1947), a STAR IS BORN-meets-TWILIGHT ZONE melodrama, keeps us riveted with a central couple that makes Diane and Camilla look like... well, Betty and Rita.

 

Time Table

0:00 Dangerous Corner

1:01:30 Repeat Performance

2:11 Mailbag!

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out.

Direct download: dangerous_repeat.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:40am EDT

Mulholland Dr. (2001) and Inland Empire (2006)

A very special extravaganza in which Dave and Elise return to themes of temporal strangeness, alternate universes, transdimensional beings, and doubling in David Lynch. We contemplate how Laura Dern in INLAND EMPIRE (2006) is like Scott Bakula in QUANTUM LEAP, and how the final section of MULHOLLAND DR (2001) might be like the alternate universe in IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE. If you are a person who cares about the good life, you will enjoy this podcast episode.

 

Time Table

0:00 Mulholland Dr.

2:34 Inland Empire

4:24:30 Mailbag!

 

We've got a time-Tumblr! Please do check it out and interact with us there!

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out

 

 

Direct download: mulholland_empire.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:12pm EDT

The Philadelphia Experiment (1984) and The Final Countdown (1980)

In this episode of the podcast, Dave and Elise contemplate two movies about time travel and the military, one of which takes us from WWII to the 80s (THE PHILADELPHIA EXPERIMENT, 1984) and the other in the opposite direction (THE FINAL COUNTDOWN, 1980). We contemplate Nancy Allen's power to soothe Dave and Martin Sheen's weird second-hand Stockholm effect on Elise, and prove not to know such basic facts as whether deserts are subject to seasonal temperature changes and whether there were helicopters in the 1940s (at least without referring to ANNIE, 1982, for the answer)*. To quote listener Jay, who appears again in our Mail Bag section, “Pseudo-intellectuals indeed.”

*According to historynet.com: “The Army bought its first helicopter, a Vought-Sikorsky XR-4, on January 10, 1941, and operated a few improved models of that aircraft in Europe and Asia during the later stages of World War II. The first recorded use of a U.S. helicopter in combat came in May 1944, when an Army chopper rescued four drowned airmen behind enemy lines in Burma.” According to the TV Tropes page for ANNIE, “That helicopter is quite advanced for 1933. Considering Warbucks calls it an 'auto-copter' and describes it as a new invention, it's possibly meant to be some kind of Diesel Punk device.” That shows us not to rely on early 80s musicals about the Depression for our historical knowledge. Pseudo-intellectuals INDEED. I think Dave's new novel might be in the Diesel Punk genre, though.

 

(New!) Index

0:00 Greetings and The Philadelphia Experiment

1:46 The Final Countdown

2:29 Feedback

 

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out

Direct download: philadelphia_experiment_and_final_countdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:44pm EDT

Lost in Austen (2008)

What happens when Jane Austen meets Back to the Future? In LOST IN AUSTEN (2008), a modern-day Pride and Prejudice fan travels to the fictional past and tries not to screw up the canon pairings, but it's hard when you're irresistible to every man in the story, and some of the women. Dave and Elise try to figure out if Mary Sue can ever be an adequate substitute for Elizabeth Bennet, and whether the latter would really choose the internet over Mr. Darcy. Elise struggles to remember what she actually discovered as a research assistant on the Cambridge Edition of Jane Austen's Juvenilia (2006) except that Austen hated babies, and Dave laments his Stereo Mouth.

The discussion leads inexorably to the interesting quetion: Are ALL time travel tales "Mary Sue" narratives?

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Finally, as suggested by listener Jay, here's an Amazon link to Dave's time travel novel, Hypocritic Days (published by Insomniac Press), which is set in the pulp magazine and film worlds of the early 1930s. Please do let us know if you check it out!

 

Direct download: AKOD_-_Lost_in_Austen.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:43pm EDT

Terminator: Genisys (2015)

It's sequel time on Another Kind of Distance as Elise Moore and David Fiore tackle Alan Taylor's Terminator Genisys (2015). We attempt to peel away its Primer-like layers of plot complexity and find ourselves wondering if the writers even realize that those layers are there. Is it possible that they forgot to cast the "prime" mover of the alternate universe that takes shape in this film?

Also: David finds a flimsy pretext for working in a reference to old Marvel comics.  

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Direct download: AKOD_-_Terminator_Genisys.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:38pm EDT

Midnight in Paris (2011) and Sleeper (1973)

In this episode Dave and Elise accompany Woody Allen on his temporal travels, to the past (MIDNIGHT IN PARIS) and future (SLEEPER), and discover, without much surprise, that he likes the past better. Find out why Woody Allen has it in for utopias, why Elise has it in for Woody Allen, and why Dave and Elise think that MIDNIGHT IN PARIS may be the ultimate Valium movie. Also – we celebrate the receipt of our first e-mail at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com. Oh frabjous day!

Don't forget, you can always contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

 

Direct download: AKOD_-_Woody_Allen.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:21pm EDT

Groundhog Day (1993) and Edge of Tomorrow (2014}

The two movies Elise Moore and David Fiore discuss in this episode epitomize the maxim, “If at first you don't succeed...”. In Groundhog Day, Bill Murray, at the splendid height of his original sarcastic comedic persona, is given apparently limitless chances to accept limitation and adjust his attitude, which is the amount he needs; while the curious Edge of Tomorrow examines the ways in which the structure of Groundhog Day (although nothing else about it) resembles a video game, and slaps a weirdly generic, Sirkean title on the results.

Don't forget, you can always write us at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

 

Direct download: AKOD_-_Groundhog_Day_and_Edge_of_Tomorrow.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:08pm EDT

Dave and Elise contemplate two movies that share a warped sense of time and humour and the kind of reticence about meaning and what's even actually happening that induces hyperinterpretation. In the process we discover that we can talk about a David Lynch film for two hours even when it's not one of our favourites. 

We need your help figuring out what's happening in these movies - the time travel, if there is any, and the rest of it too! Send your theories to anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, or contact us through our Facebook Page or Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

And remember to DREAM.

Direct download: AKOD_-_Lost_Highway_and_Donnie_Darko.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:20pm EDT

City on the Edge of Forever (Star Trek TOS) and The Girl in the Fireplace (New Who)

In Part 2 of our Nimoy tribute, we look at two TV episodes dealing with time travel romance. If you've been listening to the show for a while (or even just listened to the first episode), you may already suspect that time travel + romance =/= good times all around. We contemplate the problems for writers of tragedy created by having a time-travelling hero. Also, Elise would like to apologize once and for all for always saying "cyberpunk" when she means "steampunk" (or in this case, gearpunk) in an attempt to show off her non-existent knowledge of cutting-edge sci-genres. 

Please don't hesitate to contact us, either at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, on our Facebook Page, our Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms), or David's Tumblr (where you'll find a bunch of images). 

We're on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Direct download: AKOD_-_City_on_the_Edge_of_Forever_and_The_Girl_in_the_Fireplace.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:24pm EDT

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986) and Star Trek (2009)

In this episode we join the rest of the internet in paying tribute to Leonard Nimoy and his indelible creation, Mr. Spock, by looking at two time-travel movies in which he plays a key role. First we look at the Nimoy-conceived-and-directed Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), a lighthearted adventure in which Spock discovers his affinity for humpback whales and his uncanny naivety seems to spread to the rest of the crew – including Kirk, who has trouble mackin' under these conditions. Then we consider the very different, badass-centric interpretation of these characters in J. J. Abrams' reboot Star Trek (2009). Kirk has some trouble mackin' in this movie too, come to think of it – Spock not so much. 

Please don't hesitate to contact us, either at anotherkindofdistance@gmail.com, on our Facebook Page, our Twitter account (@TimeTravelFilms), or David's Tumblr (where you'll find a bunch of images). 

We're now on all of the podcast delivery services, including iTunes, TuneIn radio and Stitcher, so please rate/review us there, if you can!

Direct download: Star_IV_The_Voyage_Home_and_Star_Trek_2009.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:01am EDT